These $2,495 boots are made for climbing!

Posted: June 14, 2013 by kirisyko in Climbing, High altitude mountaineering
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Sixty years ago,Tenzing Norgay,along with Sir Edmund Hillary,took the  first steps at the summit of Mount Everest, the highest point on earth, wearing a pair of Bally’s Reindeer Himalaya boots.

To celebrate their storied ascent, the Swiss shoe manufacturer is issuing a new version of the boots – which are still made of reindeer fur, but the sole is lighter in weight and they lace more easily.

At $2,495 a pop, the revamped boot ‘may very well end up in St. Moritz. But it could just as well end up on Madison Avenue on a snowy winter day,’ said Graeme Fidler, who, together with Michael Herz, took over as Bally’s creative directors in 2010.

High climbing to high fashion: To celebrate their storied ascent, Bally is issuing a new version of the Reindeer Himalaya boots worn by Tenzing Norgay at the summit of Mount Everest 60 years ago

High climbing to high fashion: Bally is issuing a new version of the Reindeer Himalaya boots, worn by Tenzing Norgay at the summit of Mount Everest, 60 years ago; the revamped boots retail for $2,495

‘This was actually something we discussed when we first arrived at Bally,’ Mr Herz told SOMA magazine.

‘Being associated with this very expedition and this connection with innovation was something we wanted to explore and make people aware of. It was quite fascinating to discover the imagery in the archive and watch the film footage.’

Top of the world: Norgay was captured by Hillary on May 29, 1953 standing at the summit of Mt Everest, wearing the high performing boots

Top of the world: Norgay was captured by Hillary on May 29, 1953 standing at the summit of Mt Everest, wearing the high performing boots

Norgay was captured by Hillary on May 29, 1953 in what is arguably one of the 20th century’s most memorable photos: standing at the summit of Mount Everest, wearing the high performing boots.

Bally, which is perhaps known for its high fashion more than high climbing, began custom-making boots for serious mountaineers in the Forties.

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